Women Are Great Negotiators, Just Not For Themselves

Women Are Great Negotiators, Just Not For Themselves

A study has shown that women are great negotiators, just not for themselves.  But why?  It turns out that women tend to feel uncomfortable in this position and struggle to balance their needs with the expectation that they are likeable and easy-going.  And it’s not paranoia.  Women who negotiate during interviews are viewed unfavorably by male and female managers as someone they don’t want to work with.

While this can be traced to a lack of training in business schools, I also view it as a residual societal effect.

Early on, girls are taught to be passive.  We aren’t supposed to be loud, overly self-expressive, and independent.   So there’s no surprise that many of us feel uncomfortable negotiating on our own behalf.  We are also taught to look out for and take care of others, which may explain that we tend to be more aggressive when negotiating for others.

42 million women live in or at the edge of poverty.  And taking into account the average earnings of all men and women working full-time, women on average still make just 77 cents on the dollar that a man makes, and this figure is lower for African American and Latino women.

With numbers like this, we literally can’t afford to not have our best interest and livelihood in mind when it comes to salaries. So, how do we fix this problem?

In order to alleviate some of the pressure when negotiating a salary or raise, women are encouraged to consider all of the people they are responsible for, their spouse, children, pets, etc.  Doing so provides an alternate perspective and increases the likelihood that we will be less passive when negotiating.

Listen to the full story which appeared on NPR’s Morning Edition for more details, it’s only five minutes.

Oceal Ross
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Oceal Ross

Editor-In-Chief at Urbyn Loft
I’m just a small-town girl with astronomical dreams, trying to live the life my grandmother couldn’t. I love nerd things, Vegetarian food, and ambition. I mostly write about culture, music, and ways to help professionals increase productivity and achieve their work-life balance.
Oceal Ross
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